A dream within a dream by Edgar Allan Poe

A Dream Within a Dream by Edgar Allan Poe

Spread The WordShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

A dream within a dream by Edgar Allan Poe
Take this kiss upon the brow!
And, in parting from you now,
Thus much let me avow —
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone?
All that we see or seem
Is but

a dream within a dream.

I stand amid the roar
Of a surf-tormented shore,
And I hold within my hand
Grains of the golden sand —
How few! yet how they creep
Through my fingers to the deep,
While I weep — while I weep!
O God! Can I not grasp
Them with a tighter clasp?
O God! can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?

A dream within a dream was first published in 1949. The poem dramatizes a confusion in watching the important things in life slip away. The poem was first published in the March 31, 1849 edition of a Boston-based periodical called Flag of Our Union. The same publication had only two weeks before first published Poe’s short story “Hop-Frog.” The next month, owner Frederick Gleason announced it could no longer pay for whatever articles and poems it published.

The structure of “A Dream Within a Dream” consists of two stanzas containing two disparate but ultimately connected scenes. The first stanza shows the first-person point of view of the narrator parting from a lover, while the second places the narrator on a beach while futilely attempting to grasp a handful of sand in his hand. Despite the apparent differences between the two stanzas, they are linked through the ironic similarity of their evanescent natures.

Learn More About this Poem

Spread The WordShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
Pages:
Edit